ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN WORLD VIEWS[1]

Briercrest College

IDST 400

 

Joel L. From, PhD                                                                                               Office: Room # 132

January 4-8, 2011                                                                                              Office Hours: By Appointment

3 Credit Hours                                                                                                    Office: 756-3203

jfrom@briercrest.ca                                                                                           Home: 756-2847

Web-page: www.joelfrom.com

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

This course integrates biblical and general studies, examines the philosophical and historical bases for various world views, and assists each student in developing and articulating a comprehensive world view.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 75 credit hours

 

 

COURSE TEXTBOOKS:

 

Bellah, Robert, et al. Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1996.  ISBN: 978-0-520-35419-0

 

Course Package: Each student is required to purchase the Advanced Studies course package from the bookstore. The bookstore will send your instructor a notice to confirm your purchase.

 

Class Notes: Each student is required to purchase a voucher for the Advanced Studies in-class notes at the bookstore. These notes will be distributed throughout the week. The bookstore will send your instructor a notice to confirm your purchase.

 

Quick Reference Format Guide 2010-11: Each student is required to have access to the current Briercrest College Format Guide. If you do not possess one, purchase one from the bookstore.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

A.         Cognitive Objectives

 

             1.         To enable the student to comprehend several implications of the Christian worldview

             2.         To develop breadth and depth of perspective on selected issues

             3.         To re-evaluate several major assumptions within evangelicalism

 

B.         Affective Objectives

 

             1.         To cause the student to feel the force of well-crafted arguments, especially when their conclusions differ from his or her own view

             2.         To help the student appreciate the beauty of new and penetrating insights

             3.         To assist the student in appreciating the importance of tracing the origins of ideas

 

C.         Skill Development Objectives

 

             1.         To assist the student in detecting and appreciating sound arguments

             2.         To assist the student in reading with "critical humility"

             3.         To encourage the student in a lifelong investigation of the ideas which inform her worldview

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

A.         Periodic, unannounced quizzes will be given on the Required Readings due on a given class day.

             Value: 15%

 

B.         Each student will write a thesis defense paper which provides a world view analysis of an evangelical ministry practice. Your thesis should reflect the nature of this course, that is, it should probe beneath the surface of these ministry practices to their underlying conceptual models or world views. Be careful to clearly define what a world view is and show that one or more are influencing the ministry practices you have chosen to analyze. Please do not offer a critique or evaluation of these practices. Your instructor is looking for world view analysis, not whether or not these practices, or their underlying world views, are justified. Please append a photocopy of the first page of each reference used. Papers must be submitted in hardcopy. Do not rely too heavily on internet sources; it would be best to have less than 50% of your sources come from that source.

Value: 30%                             Due:    January 28, 2011 at 5:00 p.m.

 

C.         Each student will write a Midterm Exam on January 7, 2011. All students will write a Final Exam (as scheduled at the conclusion of the course). The Midterm is worth 25% and the Final, 30% of the course grade.

 

 

COURSE POLICIES:

 

Students are expected to be aware of the policies that govern all course work at Briercrest College. Please refer to Academic Handbook - http://www.briercrest.ca/documents/college/college-academic-handbook.pdf. In particular, please note the following policies (some of which are modified to fit a modular course):

 

Attendance: For this modular course, students missing more than 6 hours (one day) of class will receive an automatic zero in the course.

 

Final Exams: Students are allowed 3 hours to write their final exam. ALL final exams are mandatory; failure to write one will result in an “F” (0%) for the course.

 

Late Assignments: For this modular course, the only assignment is due on January 28, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. at either your instructor’s office, the assignment box in Academic Services or, if you are not resident in Caronport after the course, postmarked on or before January 28, 2011. If your assignment is turned in between the due date and February 4, 2011 at 5:00 p.m., you will be penalized 20%. Assignments turned in after  time will receive a zero.

 

Academic Integrity and Honesty:

Please refer to the policy on pages 7-9 in the Academic Handbook (see the link above).

 

Learning Disabled or Special Needs Students: Any student with a documented disability who needs accommodations should discuss them with the course instructor after contacting the Academic Services Office, in person, or by email at academicservices@briercrest.ca
COURSE SECTIONS AND REQUIRED READINGS:

 

Unit

Section Title

Required Readings

Day

 

 

 

 

Unit 1.

Worldviews as Cultural Agents

 

1

    I.

What is a Worldview?

Naugle, “Prologue: Uncle Andrew . . . “

1

   II.

God, Nature, and Miracles

 

1

  III.

Testing a Worldview?

Nash, “How to Choose a Worldview”

1

  IV.

Mass Media and Worldview Formation

McLuhan, “The Medium is the Message”

1-2

 

Unit 2.

The Rise (and Fall) of Programmatic Ministry

 

 

    I.

Introduction

 

2

   II.

The Decline of the Medieval Cosmos

Daly, Cosmic Harmony, 5-10

2

  III.

The Emergence of Formal Institutions

Bailyn, “An Interpretation,” 15-41

2

  IV.

The Dispersal of the Modern Household

Fishman, “London: Birthplace of Suburbia”

Hunter, “An Excursus”

2

2

   V.

Newtonianism and Its Universal Application

Toulmin & Goodfield, “The New Picture Takes Shape”

3

  VI.

The Religious System and Its Migratory Functions

Scott, “The Ministry Transformed”

3

 VII.

The Unintended Consequences of Programmatic Newtonianism

 

3

VIII.

Towards a Non-Newtonian Ecclesiology

Hallie, “Prelude”

3

 

 

 

 

Unit 3.

Individualism as Primary Culture

 

 

     I.

Introduction

Bellah et al., Chapters 1 & 2

4

    II.

Finding Oneself

Bellah et al., Chapter 3

4

   III.

Love and Marriage

Bellah et al., Chapter 5

4

   IV.

Reaching Out

Bellah et al., Chapter 4

4

    V.

Individualism

Bellah et al., Chapter 6

5

   VI.

Getting Involved

Bellah et al., Chapter 7

5

  VII.

Religion

Bellah et al., Chapter 9

**Wuthnow,  “Introduction”

5

5

 

 

**This article is available at the Reserve Desk in Archibald Library.


 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Materials Used Directly in the Course)

 

 

Bailyn, Bernard. “An Interpretation.” In Education in the Forming of American Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1960.

 

Bellah, Robert et al. Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life. [1985]. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1996.

 

Daly, James. Cosmic Harmony and Political Thinking in Early Stuart England. Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society, 1979.

 

Fishman, Robert. “London: Birthplace of Suburbia.” In Bourgeois Utopias: The Rise and Fall of Suburbia. New York: Basic Books, 1987.

 

Hallie, Philip.  “Prelude.” In Lest Innocent Blood Be Shed: The Story of the Village of Le Chambon and How Goodness Happened There. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994.

 

Hunter, James D. “An Excursus” in Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987, 83-91.

 

McLuhan, Marshall. “The Medium is the Message.” In Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1964.

 

Nash, Ronald. “How to Choose a Worldview.” In Worldviews in Conflict. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub., 1992.

 

Naugle, David K.  “Prologue: Uncle Andrew in C. S. Lewis’s The Magican’s Nephew.” In Worldview: The History of a Concept. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2002.

 

Scott, Donald M. “The Ministry Transformed.” In From Office to Profession: The New England Ministry 1750-1850. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1978.

 

Toulmin, Steven, and June Goodfield. “The New Picture Takes Shape.” Chapter 9 in The Fabric of the Heavens. New York: Harper and Row, 1961.

 

Wuthnow, Robert.  “Introduction.” In Sharing the Journey: Support Groups and America’s New Quest for Community, New York: The Free Press, 1994.


COURSE PACKAGE

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Naugle, David K.  “Prologue: Uncle Andrew in C. S. Lewis’s The Magican’s Nephew.” In Worldview: The History of a Concept. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2002.

 

Nash, Ronald. “How to Choose a Worldview.” In Worldviews in Conflict. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub., 1992.

 

McLuhan, Marshall. “The Medium is the Message.” In Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1964.

 

Daly, James. Cosmic Harmony and Political Thinking in Early Stuart England. Philadelphia: The American Philosophical Society, 1979.

 

Bailyn, Bernard. “An Interpretation.” In Education in the Forming of American Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1960.

 

Fishman, Robert. “London: Birthplace of Suburbia.” In Bourgeois Utopias: The Rise and Fall of Suburbia. New York: Basic Books, 1987.

 

Hunter, James Davison. Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

 

Toulmin, Steven, and June Goodfield. “The New Picture Takes Shape.” Chapter 9 in The Fabric of the Heavens. New York: Harper and Row, 1961.

 

Scott, Donald M. “The Ministry Transformed.” In From Office to Profession: The New England Ministry 1750-1850. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1978.

 

Hallie, Philip. “Prelude.” In Lest Innocent Blood Be Shed: The Story of the Village of Le Chambon and How Goodness Happened There. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994.

 

 

 

Sample Papers:

 

Anderson, Curtis. “Newtonian Individualism in the Purpose Driven Youth Ministry.” Unpublished Manuscript, 2005.

 

Lestage, Amber. “Individualism in Evangelical Family Ministries.” Unpublished Manuscript, 2004.

 



[1]Course content, requirements, and examinations are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.