INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY I[1]

Briercrest College

SOC 100

 

Joel L. From, Ph.D                                                                                 Office: Room 132

Fall 2010                                                                                                Office Hours: By Appointment

3 Credit Hours/semester                                                                       Office Phone: 756-3203

<jfrom@briercrest.ca>                                                                         Home Phone: 756-2847

Web-page: www.joelfrom.com

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

An introduction to the study of the individual in society. The course includes an historical overview of the discipline and nature of sociology in general with special emphasis on social processes.

 

 

COURSE TEXTBOOKS:

 

Henslin, James M. et al. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. 5th Canadian ed. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada, 2010.  ISBN: 9780205601493  (This text is also used in SOC101.)

 

Each student is required to purchase an Introduction to Sociology I course package. If the first printing sells out at the bookstore, more will be printed immediately after add-drops. (The first few required readings are available at the Reserve Desk in Archibald Library.)

 

Each student is required to purchase the Introduction to Sociology I  in-class notes which will be distributed each day in class. They will be charged to your student account after add/drops.

 

Quick Reference Format Guide 2010-2011: Each student is required to have and use the current Briercrest College Format Guide.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

A.         Cognitive Objectives

 

             1.         To provide a foundation for understanding contemporary social thought and trends

             2.         To prepare the student for further academic work in the social sciences

             3.         To acquaint the student with perennial issues in social science

 

B.         Affective Objectives

 

             1.         To cause the student to feel the force of well-crafted arguments, especially when their conclusions differ from his or her own view

             2.         To help the student appreciate the beauty of new and penetrating insights

             3.         To initiate the student into the realm of fundamental ideas

 

C.         Skill Development Objectives

 

             1.         To initiate the process of sociological analysis and written composition

             2.         To assist the student in detecting and appreciating sound sociological argument

3.              To encourage the student to read with sociological understanding


COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

A.         Dialogue with the readings is extremely important! Therefore, unannounced quizzes will be periodically given on the Required Reading for that day.

             Value: 15%

 

B.         Each student will submit Argument Summaries for two selected readings (These readings are indicated by underscoring and bolding in the course’s Required Readings). Argument Summaries (approximately 1000 words) should clearly show the logical structure or chain of reasoning which the author uses to support his thesis. Please do not add your editorial or evaluative comments. Please do not directly quote the author—use your own words. Summaries submitted after the beginning of class on their due date will not be accepted.

             Due Dates:  Marx—Sept. 20; Fishman—Oct. 4   

             Value: 15% (times 2) = 30%

 

C.         Each student will build a Portfolio of her/his essays in this course. Please submit your portfolio with each written assignment. Please paperclip your essays together—no duotangs or folders. Please include the original, marked-up copy of your previous paper(s) in the portfolio. With the exception of your first summary, papers submitted without a portfolio will not be accepted

 

D.         Each student will write a Midterm Exam on November 1, 2010 and a Final Exam (as scheduled by the Registrar’s office). The Midterm is worth 25%, and the Final, 30% of the final grade.

 

 

COURSE POLICIES:

 

Students are expected to be aware of the policies that govern all course work at Briercrest College. Please refer to Academic Handbook - http://www.briercrest.ca/documents/college/college-academic-handbook.pdf. In particular, please note the following policies:

 

Attendance: All students missing more than 2 full weeks, from the first day to the last day, of a particular class will receive an automatic fail “F” (0%).

 

Final Exams: Students are allowed 3 hours to write each final exam. They must write their final exams as scheduled. ALL final exams are mandatory; failure to write one will result in an “F” (0%) for the course.

 

Late Assignments:

·         All assignments are due at the beginning of the class period on the assigned day.

·         Unless otherwise stated, late assignments will be accepted for one week from the original due date with a penalty of 20% deducted from the assignment value. All late assignments are due at the beginning of class one week from the assigned date.

·         Assignments not submitted within one week of the original due date will not be accepted and will receive a "0".

 

Academic Integrity and Honesty:

Please refer to the policy on pages 7-9 in the Academic Handbook (see the link above).

 

Learning Disabled or Special Needs Students:

Any student with a documented disability who needs accommodations should discuss them with the course instructor after contacting the Academic Services Office, in person, or by email at academicservices@briercrest.ca.

 


 

COURSE UNITS, TITLES, AND REQUIRED READINGS:[2]

 

 

Unit

Section Title

Required Readings

 

 

 

Unit 1

The Sociological Perspective

 

  I.

Introduction and Overview

Mills, "The Promise of Sociology" [CP & AL]

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 1

  II.

Pioneers of Sociological  Explanation

 

     A.

Auguste Comte

Comte, "The Positive Philosophy" [CP & AL]

     B.

Emile Durkheim

Durkheim, "What is a Social Fact?" [AL Only]

     C.

Karl Marx

Marx, "Classes in Capitalism and Pre-Capitalism" [CP & AL]

 

 

 

Unit 2

Unit Ideas in Sociology

 

  I.

Introduction to 'Unit-Ideas'

Nisbet, “The Unit Ideas of Sociology,” 3-9 [CP]

  II.

The Two Revolutions

Nisbet, “The Two Revolutions” [CP]

  III.

Community

Nisbet, “The Problem of Community” [CP]

Fishman, “London: Birthplace of Suburbia” [CP]

  IV.

Authority

De Tocqueville, “The Omnipotence of the Majority” [CP]

  V.

The Sacred

De Coulanges, The Ancient City, 3-34 [CP]

  VI.

Alienation

 

 

 

 

Unit 3

Social Processes

 

  I.

Social Research

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 2

  II.

Social Structure

No Reading

  III.

Culture

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 3

  IV.

Socialization

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 4, 66-79

  V.

Socialization & Groups

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 4, 79-93

Wuthnow, "Introduction" [AL Only]

  VI.

Crime & Social Deviance

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 16

Durkheim, "The Normality of Crime" [AL Only]

  VII.

Social Change

Coleman, "The Rational Reconstruction of Society" [CP]

Bailyn, "An Interpretation," 15-41 [CP]


 COURSE BIBLIOGRAPHY

             (Materials Used Directly in the Course)

 

 

Bailyn, Bernard.  “An Interpretation.”  Education in the Forming of American Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1960.

 

Coleman, James. "The Rational Reconstruction of Society." American Sociological Review 58 (Feb. 1993): 1-15.

 

Comte, Auguste. "The Positive Philosophy." Excerpts from The Positive Philosophy. Translated by Harriet Martineau.  London: John Chapman, 1853.  Reprinted in Sociological Perspectives, 18-32.

 

Contemporary Sociology.  Edited by Peter S. Li and B. Singh Bolaria.  Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1993.

 

De Coulanges, Denis. The Ancient City: A Study of the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome [1864].  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.

 

De Tocqueville, Alexis.  “The Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effects.” In Democracy in America. Translated by George Lawrence. Edited by J. P. Mayer. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, Anchor Books, 1969.

 

Durkheim, Emile.  "The Normality of Crime."  Excerpts from The Rules of Sociological Method.  8th ed.  New York: The Free Press, 1938.  Reprinted in Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings. 4th ed.  Edited by Lewis A. Coser et al.  New York: Macmillan Pub. Co., 1976.

 

Fishman, Robert. “London: Birthplace of Suburbia.” In Bourgeois Utopias: The Rise and Fall of Suburbia.  New York: Basic Books, 1987.

 

Henslin, James M. et al. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. 5th Canadian Edition. Toronto: Pearson Canada, 2010.

 

Marx, Karl. "Classes in Capitalism and Pre-Capitalism."  Excerpted from The Communist Manifesto, The Poverty of Philosophy, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, and Capital. Vol. 3. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, 69-76.

 

________. "The Promise of Sociology." Excerpted from The Sociological Imagination. Reprinted in Seeing Ourselves. 4th ed.  Edited by John J. Macionis and Nijole V. Benekraitis.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998, 1-5.

 

Nisbet, Robert. “The Problem of Community.” Excerpted from The Quest for Community, [1953]. Reprinted in Communitarianism: A New Public Ethics. Edited by Markate Daly. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1994.

 

________. “The Two Revolutions.” In The Sociological Tradition. Revised Edition. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, Rutgers—The State University, 1993.

 

________. “The Unit Ideas of Sociology.” In The Sociological Tradition. Revised Edition. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, Rutgers—The State University, 1993.

 

Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 3d ed. Edited by B. Singh Bolaria. Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 2000.

 

Sociological Perspectives.  Edited by Kenneth Thompson et al. Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1975.

 

Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings.  4th ed.  Edited by Lewis A. Coser et al. New York: Macmillan Pub. Co., 1976.

 

Sociology. 5th ed. Edited by Robert Hagedorn.  Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Co., 1994.

 

Weber, Max. “Class, Status, Party.” In Social Class and Stratification: Classic Statements and Theoretical Debates. 2d ed. Edited by Rhonda F. Levine. Lantham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2006, 49-62.

 

Wuthnow, Robert. "Introduction." In Sharing The Journey: Support Groups and America's New Quest for Community.  New York: The Free Press, 1994.

 

 

COURSE PACKAGE

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Mills, C. Wright.  "The Promise of Sociology." Excerpted from The Sociological Imagination. Reprinted in Seeing Ourselves. 4th ed.  Edited by John J. Macionis and Nijole V. Benekraitis.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998.

 

Comte, Auguste. "The Positive Philosophy." Excerpts from The Positive Philosophy. Translated by Harriet Martineau.  London: John Chapman, 1853.  Reprinted in Sociological Perspectives.  Edited by Kenneth Thompson et al.  Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1975.

 

Marx, Karl.  "Classes in Capitalism and Pre-Capitalism."  Excerpted from The Communist Manifesto, The Poverty of Philosophy, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, and Capital. Vol. 3. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective.  Edited by David Grusky.  Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994.

 

Nisbet, Robert. “The Unit Ideas of Sociology.” In The Sociological Tradition. Revised Edition. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, Rutgers—The State University, 1993.

 

________. “The Two Revolutions.” In The Sociological Tradition. Revised Edition. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, Rutgers—The State University, 1993.

 

________. “The Problem of Community.” Excerpted from The Quest for Community, [1953]. Reprinted in Communitarianism: A New Public Ethics. Edited by Markate Daly. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1994.

 

Fishman, Robert. “London: Birthplace of Suburbia.” In Bourgeois Utopias: The Rise and Fall of Suburbia.  New York: Basic Books, 1987.

 

De Tocqueville, Alexis. “The Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effects.” In Democracy in America. Translated by George Lawrence. Edited by J. P. Mayer. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, Anchor Books, 1969.

 

De Coulanges, Denis. The Ancient City: A Study of the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome [1864].  Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.

 

Coleman, James. "The Rational Reconstruction of Society." American Sociological Review 58 (Feb. 1993): 1-15.

 

Bailyn, Bernard.  “An Interpretation.”  Education in the Forming of American Society. New York: Vintage Books, 1960.

 



[1]Course content, requirements, and examinations are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

[2]The abbreviation after a required reading indicates its location. [CP] refers to the course package. [AL] refers to the Reserve Desk in Archibald Library.