INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY II[1]

Briercrest College

SOC101

 

Joel L. From, PhD                                                                                  Office: Room 132

Winter 2011                                                                                            Office Hours: By Appointment.

3 Credit Hours                                                                                        Office Phone: 756-3203

jfrom@briercrest.ca                                                                             Home Phone: 756-2847

Web-page: www.joelfrom.com

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

An introduction to the study of the structure of society. The course gives special attention to social stratification, social institutions, and social issues with emphasis on Canadian society.

 

 

COURSE TEXTBOOKS:

 

Henslin, James M. et al. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. 5th Canadian ed. Toronto: Pearson Education Canada, 2010.  ISBN: 9780205601493

 

Each student is required to purchase an Introduction to Sociology II (SOC 101) course package.

 

Each student is required to purchase the Introduction to Sociology II in-class notes which will be distributed each day. They will be charged to your student account after add/drops.

 

Quick Reference Format Guide 2010-2011: Each student is required to have access to a copy of the current Briercrest College Format Guide.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

A.         Cognitive Objectives

 

             1.         To provide a foundation for understanding contemporary social thought and trends

             2.         To prepare the student for further academic work in the social sciences

             3.         To acquaint the student with perennial issues in social science

 

B.         Affective Objectives

 

             1.         To cause the student to feel the force of well-crafted arguments, especially when their conclusions differ from his or her own view

             2.         To help the student appreciate the beauty of new and penetrating insights

             3.         To initiate the student into the realm of fundamental ideas

             4.         To infuse this rich heritage of great minds into the student's own thinking

 

C.         Skill Development Objectives

 

             1.         To initiate the process of sociological analysis and written composition

             2.         To assist the student in detecting and appreciating sound sociological argument

3.              To encourage the student to read with sociological understanding


COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

A.         Dialogue with the readings is extremely important! Therefore, unannounced quizzes will be periodically given on the Required Reading(s) for that day.

             Value: 10%

 

B.        Each student will choose one of the tables in the class notes for SOC 101 posted on your instructor’s website (joelfrom.com). Please do not choose either of the first two tables. You are asked to research the material presented in the table and give a brief (5 minute) oral presentation on it as well as a 2-page written report which includes the substance of your oral report. You could, for instance, provide a compelling illustration of the underlying social reality. In any case, you should be prepared to offer analysis and insight into the data. The tables will be assigned on a first-come basis. Your written reports are due at the time you present in class.

            Value:             15%

 

C.         Each student will write a 2500+ word Thesis Defense Paper. Your paper should deal with an important (and controversial) sociological issue. It is very important that your paper defend a thesis, that is, it must rationally persuade your reader to adopt a certain (contestable) viewpoint with respect to your topic. Please do not merely chronicle what others have said. Please append a photocopy of the first page of each reference cited.

             Due Date:       March 28, 2011

             Value: 25%

 

D.         Each student will write a Midterm Exam on February 28, 2011 and a Final Exam (as scheduled by the Registrar’s office). The Midterm is worth 20%, and the Final, 30% of the final grade.

 

 

COURSE POLICIES:

 

Students are expected to be aware of the policies that govern all course work at Briercrest College. Please refer to Academic Handbook (www.briercrest.ca/documents/college/college-academic-handbook.pdf). In particular, please note the following policies:

 

Attendance: All students missing more than 2 full weeks, from the first day to the last day, of a particular class will receive an automatic fail “F” (0%).

 

Final Exams: Students are allowed 3 hours to write each final exam. They must write their final exams as scheduled. ALL final exams are mandatory; failure to write one will result in an “F” (0%) for the course.

 

Late Assignments:

·         All assignments are due at the beginning of the class period on the assigned day.

·         Unless otherwise stated, late assignments will be accepted for one week from the original due date with a penalty of 20% deducted from the assignment value. All late assignments are due at the beginning of class one week from the assigned date.

·         Assignments not submitted within one week of the original due date will not be accepted and will receive a "0".

 

Academic Integrity and Honesty:

Please refer to the policy on pages 7-9 in the Academic Handbook.

 

Learning Disabled or Special Needs Students:

Any student with a documented disability who needs accommodations should discuss them with the course instructor after contacting the Academic Services Office, in person, or by email at: academicservices@briercrest.ca.


COURSE UNITS, TITLES, AND REQUIRED READINGS:[2]

 

 


Unit

Section Title

Required Readings

 

 

 

Unit 4

Social Stratification

 

  I.

Introduction

 

  II.

Stratification Variables

 

     A.

Economic Class

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 6

     B.

Social Status

 

     C.

Power

Mills, "The Power Elite" [CP]

     D.

Income

 

  III.

Functions/Dysfunctions of Stratification

Davis & Moore, "Some Principles of Stratification" [CP]

Tumin, "Some Principles of Stratification" [CP]

  IV.

Ascriptive Processes

 

     A.

Introduction

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 8

     B.

 

Racial and Ethnic Stratification

Satzewich, "Social Stratification: Class and Racial Inequality" [CP]

Lemann, "The Origins of the Underclass" [CP]

     C.

Gender Stratification

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 7

 

 

 

Unit 5

Social Institutions

 

  I.

The Family

Whitehead,  "Dan Quayle Was Right" [CP]

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 13

  II.

Education

Cote and Allahar, “Troubles in Paradise” [CP]

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 14, 308-25

  III.

Religion

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 14, 325-42

Bibby, "The Imminent Crisis" [CP]

  IV.

Mass Communication

Meyrowitz, "New Group Identities" [CP]

  V.

Health Care

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 15

 

Unit 6

Social Issues

 

  I.

Urban Sociology

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 17, 390-97

  II.

Rural Sociology                             

Bolaria et al., "Rural Issues and Problems” [CP]

  III.

Modernization

Drucker, "The Age of Social Transformation" [CP]

 

 

 

Unit 7

Selected Canadian Issues

 

  I.

Demography

SOCIOLOGY, Chapter 17, 383-90

  II.

Quebec Society

Denis, "Quebec Society" [CP]

  III.

Aboriginal Peoples

Frideres, "First Nations: Walking the Path of Social Change" [CP]

 

 


BIBLIOGRAPHY

             (Materials Used Directly in the Course)

 

 

Bibby, Reginald W.  "The Imminent  Crisis." In Unknown Gods. Toronto: Stoddard Pub. Co., 1993.

 

Bolaria, B. Singh et al. "Rural Issues and Problems." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 2d ed. Toronto: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, Canada, 1991, 393-416.

 

Cote, James E. and Anton L. Allahar. “Troubles in Paradise.” In Ivory Tower Blues: A University System in Crisis. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007.

 

Davis, Kingsley, and Wilbert E. Moore. "Some Principles of Stratification." American Sociological Review 10 (April 1945): 242-49. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, 39-46.

 

Denis, Wilfred.  "Quebec Society." In Contemporary Sociology, 518-43.

 

Drucker, Peter. "The Age of Social Transformation."  The Atlantic Monthly. November 1994, 53-80.

 

Frideres, James.  "First Nations: Walking the Path of Social Change." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society, 3d. ed., 195-227.

 

Henslin, James M. et al. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach, 4th Canadian Edition. Scarborough, Ontario: Pearson Canada, 2007.

 

Henslin, James M. et al. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach, 5th Canadian Edition. Toronto: Pearson Canada, 2010.

 

Lemann, Nicholas. "The Origins of the Underclass." Atlantic Monthly, June 1986.  Excerpted in Individualism and Commitment in American Life.  Edited by Robert Bellah et al. New York: Harper and Row, 1987.

 

Meyrowitz, Joshua. “New Group Identities.” In No Sense of Place.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

 

Mills, C. Wright. "The Power Elite." Excerpted from The Power Elite, [1956]. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, 161-70.

 

Novek, John and Kampen, Karen. “Sustainable or Unsustainable Development? An Analysis of an Environmental Controversy,” Canadian Journal of Sociology 17 (1992). Excerpted in Society in Question. Edited by Robert Brym. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Canada, 1996, 289-300.

 

Satzewich, Vic. "Social Stratification: Class and Racial Inequality." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society, 3d ed., 165-94.

 

Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 3d ed. Edited by B. Singh Bolaria. Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 2000.

 

Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective. Edited by David B. Grusky. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994.

 

Sociological Theory: A Book of Readings.  4th ed.  Edited by Lewis A. Coser et al. New York: Macmillan Pub. Co., 1976.

 

Tumin, Melvin. "Some Principles of Stratification: A Critical Analysis." American Sociological Review  18 (August 1953). Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective, 47-54.

 

Whitehead, Barbara D. "Dan Quayle Was Right." Atlantic Monthly. April 1993, 47-84.

 


COURSE PACKAGE

SOC101

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Bibby, Reginald W. "The Imminent  Crisis." In Unknown Gods. Toronto: Stoddard Pub. Co., 1993.

 

Bolaria, B. Singh et al. "Rural Issues and Problems." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 2d ed. Toronto: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, Canada, 1991.

 

Cote, James E. and Anton L. Allahar. “Troubles in Paradise,” In Ivory Tower Blues: A University System in Crisis. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007.

 

Davis, Kingsley and Wilbert E. Moore. "Some Principles of Stratification." American Sociological Review 10 (April 1945): 242-49. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective. Edited by David B. Grusky. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994.

 

Denis, Wilfred. "Quebec Society." In Contemporary Sociology.  Edited by Peter S. Li and B. Singh Bolaria. Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1993.

 

Drucker, Peter. "The Age of Social Transformation." The Atlantic Monthly, November 1994, 53-80.

 

Frideres, James. "First Nations: Walking the Path of Social Change." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 3d ed. Edited by B. Singh Bolaria. Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 2000.

 

Lemann, Nicholas. "The Origins of the Underclass." Atlantic Monthly, June 1986. Excerpted in Individualism and Commitment in American Life. Edited by Robert Bellah et al. New York: Harper and Row, 1987.

 

Meyrowitz, Joshua.  “New Group Identities.” In No Sense of Place.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

 

Mills, C. Wright. "The Power Elite." Excerpted from The Power Elite, [1956]. Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective. Edited by David B. Grusky. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994.

 

Satzewich, Vic. "Social Stratification: Class and Racial Inequality." In Social Issues and Contradictions in Canadian Society. 3d ed. Edited by B. Singh Bolaria. Toronto: Harcourt Canada, 2000.

 

Tumin, Melvin. "Some Principles of Stratification: A Critical Analysis." American Sociological Review 18 (August 1953). Reprinted in Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective. Edited by David B. Grusky. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994.

 

Whitehead, Barbara D.  "Dan Quayle Was Right."  Atlantic Monthly, April 1993, 47-84.

 

 

Sample Paper:

 

Mably, Dare. “Divorce and Educational Attainment.” Unpublished manuscript, SOC 101, 2010.



[1]Course content, requirements, and examinations are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

[2]The abbreviation after a required reading indicates its location. [CP] refers to the course package.